Category Archives: Creativity

This Explains Why Your Organization Is Not As Innovative As You Want It To Be

The quest for innovation, transforming your business, overwhelms most organizations. Most organizations just don’t know where to start, or worse they believe they’re doing it right. While there’s no 3 step recipe that anyone can follow to innovate, there are principles that make it more certain that an organization is on the right path to innovation.

Walking The Innovation Talk

An organization’s culture is the driving force behind innovation. You can have the best minds on your team, but nothing will happen if the environment doesn’t let them bring out their full potential. It’s an environment that values and encourages creativity, risk taking, experimentation, learning. Innovation doesn’t happen without experimentation, which means making mistakes.

For Creativity Practice Doesn’t Make Perfect

According to recent research by Stanford Graduate School of Business alumna Melanie S. Brucks and associate professor of marketing Szu-chi Huang, regular brainstorming sessions are not likely to lead to an increase in unique ideas. In fact, the average novelty of your output — that is, the degree to which your inspirations depart from convention — actually might decrease over time.

10 Signs You’re Just Going Through the Motions Of Innovation

Anything worth doing in life will challenge you. Our minds and bodies want to take the path of least resistance. By pushing yourself, you will get the most out of life. Like people, organizations are the same; most organizations simply go through the motions of innovation. They mistake innovation work for efficient work, but innovation is messy. It’s the opposite of business as usual, it aims to change business as usual for the better.

Innovation Isn’t The Goal

True disruption is rare, specifically because it means creating a simple solution for an unserved market at a lower cost. So I was delighted to start reading Jim McKelvey’s book The Innovation Stack. Jim is the co-founder of Square, the payments company, along with Jack Dorsey, co-founder of Twitter. In the book he uses the story of Square to shine a light on how innovation happens when you create a solution for an unserved market; classic disruption.