Tag Archives: customer experience

The core ingredients behind Andres Carne De Res unique customer experience

Andres Carne de Res

Mimes, live performances, actors, face painting activities, exotic drinks, a climbing wall…an art performance, right? Nope. It’s a restaurant in Bogota. But calling it a restaurant is an understatement; it’s an experience.

Ask anyone about their experience with Andres Carne De Res and they will talk about the experience they had first, then the food. It’s true, Andres Carne de Res is a restaurant unlike any other. For one, it’s only open three times a week and is always packed. It’s also become a popular tourist spot as people from across the world come to Andres Carne de Res to experience something truly unique.

Breaking the Mold, Rethinking How You Work with Customer

Sometimes, all a business needs to make more sales is to reach out to customers in innovative, creative, ways. A business that can fill a niche in new ways and do it with the utmost precision can set themselves apart from their competition. Here are four different ways that you can use to catapult your business into new service modalities that will wow your existing customers and bring new ones to your doors.

Just a little bit better doesn’t delight customers, it puts them to sleep

Let’s be competitive on price and offer just a little bit of better service…

I heard an on the ground salesperson say that on a call last week. I later told the CEO about it and let him know what I thought about “just a little bit”. Below is an extended version of what I said to him. A quick thought is you will never hear innovators say “just a little bit”, only non-innovators say that!

For innovation: Uncommon insights come from uncommon places

how to differentiate your businessThis is part one of the series on how to leave small thinking behind. In this first post, I’ll show you a simple technique for coming up with radical ideas. In the second part,  you’ll learn how to evaluate ideas so they don’t fit into “me-too” territory. In part three, I’ll tell you how to determine which ideas might work.

Perception separates the innovator from the imitator. So, a shift in perspective is all that is needed to see opportunities for new offerings. Here is one creative approach to do that…

One of the challenges of coming up with unconventional ideas is the weight of past ideas. Not just the ones you’ve applied, but also the ones you’ve seen, heard, tasted, smelled and felt, all of these are in your memory. You see, what we have stored in our heads is just as much a blocker of uncommon ideas as is your boss not giving you permission to go wild.

This is why the first 15 – 30 you come up with are always going to be very obvious. They are stuff you’ve already seen before. To get to the good stuff you have force your brain to come up with more. But this is quite hard  and takes some time for many to do…

But let’s suppose you don’t have the time to sit down and make a list of 50 – 100 different ideas on how to solve a pressing challenge. What’s a quick way to shake things up?

For innovation: listen to your customers but don’t believe them

Big data and analytics are going to alter customer experiences through personalization. But, companies should be wise get out of the building and not assume that big data is an innovation silver bullet.

As companies adopt social and big data technologies, automation and anticipation will become hotly adopted strategies to create or enhance existing offerings. For some industries, such as retail, providing the option for customers to order through their mobile phone is the first step towards automation and anticipation, and pretty soon we’ll start seeing people’s orders waiting for them before they even order them.

With all the data about customer habits it has accumulated over the years, Starbucks is a company that is uniquely positioned to do this. I don’t know the exact number of times the average person stops by Starbucks on their way to work, but I’m sure it is in the 3 day average.

That’s an ingrained habit.

But, even with some sense of certainty of what people might do, we still have to ask ourselves some questions: How will customers benefit from us anticipating what they will order today? At what point does novelty wear off? How will it make them feel? What would make them feel less uncomfortable?

The Customer Experience Advantage: Always be connecting dots

I once wrote about connecting the dots. But connecting the dots isn’t constrained to strategic thinking, it applies in every domain. For example, to read a person’s unspoken thoughts, you can read their body language. This takes some preparation, but it is really about connect the dots within a context.

Taking this example further, the same principle applies in the domain of customer experience. What does connecting the dots look like? To illustrate, here is what happens at Gramercy Tavern (from the book Influencer):