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Is the death of the office near?

What if you could take the office with you everywhere you go? Ten years ago it would have been wishful thinking, but it's a reality of our day to day. Technology in the form of mobile phones, collaboration software that sits in the cloud, as well as … [Read more]

First principles thinking: a better way to innovate

“If it’s a sure bet, we’re not interested,” - Jay Schnitzer, former director of Darpa's Defense Sciences Office Solving problems no one else has encountered, that's what I like to do. Last year, I was in the beginning stages of developing a new … [Read more]

The 7 essential innovation questions

The path to innovation usually starts with a question. That's what Autodesk’s Innovation Genome Project developed after it tried to quantify what worked about the 1,000 greatest innovations of all time. With that data in hand, they quickly identified … [Read more]

Question everything to break out of habitual thinking

Innovation comes from new ways of seeing and new ways of being. Learn to see different, learn to be different, and you will discover the different. Though Tijuana has to come to be known as a place where you'll find great food, I don't think that … [Read more]

Are we overly obsessed with disruptive ideas?

If you disrupt and can’t sustain, you don’t win. – Gary Pisano Disruptive innovations that throw industries into chaos hog the spotlight. We are all transfixed by Google's Moonshot attempts at either changing transportation, how we interact with … [Read more]

You can’t change the world if you haven’t seen the problem

From 6 lessons on innovation from Bill and Melinda Gates: You can’t conceptualize and find the solution for a problem you have never experienced or witnessed. The couple reckon that in order to truly be innovative you have to look at the problem and … [Read more]

To find the truth you have to look within

Peter Drucker famously remarked, "The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn't said". The same could be said of innovation techniques such as direct observation and journalistic interviews. You might ask people questions and have … [Read more]