Video Games Should Be Used at Schools and Universities To Enhance Learning

assassin creed origins discovery tour

There is debate about what the future of education looks like and how we’ll get there. What isn’t debatable is the number of challenges we face in the Next Economy; primarily reskilling. This means people will have to develop new skills, specifically ones that computing can’t take over, to thrive.

I’ve written that this challenge must be approached from the perspective of the individual, but institutions also have a part to play. The challenge for them is in the content side of things.

The way a topic is presented to us affects our motivation to learn

How do we make learning interesting? Our interest, attention and motivation to learn piques when a topic is presented to in an interesting way. No argument there. With that said, video games are a great medium to enhance learning because they engage people by immersing us and getting us to interact with a digital world.

A spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down; this is true when it comes to learning new stuff.

Take Medal of Honor and Call of Duty, two popular game franchises which put you in different world war 1 and 2 historic scenarios. Those games were not necessarily giving you a history lesson of war; indirectly they were.

Today, games are much more interactive and immersive; and we have more ways to get access to them. This opens up a world of opportunities for creating immersive and interactive environments to put people in. For example, Discovery Mode is Assassin’s Creed Origins’ new history-focused mode, which allows you to explore Ancient Egypt at your leisure and learn more about its culture and traditions.

In the video below you take a tour of the pyramid of Giza:

This is not the same as actually being there, but you can be a tourist in Egypt without having to actually go to Egypt!

As you can see, this game mode makes you feel like you’re taking part in history than merely observing it. It’s a popular feature, one that I’ve seen people message Ubisoft (creator of Assassin’s Creed) to do more of these discovery tours in their upcoming games because it makes learning fun.

In all, there are over 70 tours of Egypt within Assassin’s Creed Origins.


There are many ways to learn, video games can help connect some of the dots. How then do we make this shift to edu-tainment based video games? Will other game developers follow Ubisoft’s lead and do something similar?

I believe this will become the norm, and education institutions will have to pick-up the slack. Whether that means bringing in experts to create their own team of content developers or partnering with game creators to create immersive and interactive educational content.

Hopefully we start see more of this because education is everyone’s responsibility; not one single entity.